Lomo Loco

Lomo LocoThis is a first attempt at trying to produce a digital Lomo effect. If this is new to you, LOMO stands for Leningrad Optical Mechanical Amalgamation (Ленинградское Oптико-Mеханическое Oбъединение). They produced a camera of questionable quality that made colorful, blurry images that some considered "charming".An art movement developed around it and was advanced when it became standard practice to cross process lomography images. Cross processing is when "film intended for developing in slide chemistry (E-6) is processed in photographic negative chemistry (C-41), and vice versa". A typical lomo image also has a noticeable vignette from the inexpensive fixed mount lens, much like the Holga cameras. All of these effects can be simulated in Photoshop but I suspect it is more fun and rewarding to do on film as originally intended.Searching SmugMug for "lomo" will yield over 100 sites. Although this movement started in Austria, the Asian community seems to be the driving force much as they were for the Bokeh effect.I'll include some more info, links and describe how I did mine over on my blog later today.

This is a first attempt at trying to produce a digital Lomo effect. If you don’t already know,  LOMO stands for Leningrad Optical Mechanical Amalgamation (Ленинградское Oптико-Mеханическое Oбъединение). They produced a camera of questionable quality that made colorful, blurry images that some considered “charming”.

An art movement developed around it and it was advanced when it became standard practice to cross process lomography images. Cross processing is when “film intended for developing in slide chemistry (E-6) is processed in photographic negative chemistry (C-41), and vice versa”. A typical lomo image also has a noticeable vignette from the inexpensive fixed mount lens, much like the Holga cameras.

All of these effects can be simulated in Photoshop but I suspect it is more fun and rewarding to do on film as originally intended.

10 Golden Rules of Lomography (from http://www.lomography.com/)

  • Take your camera everywhere you go
  • Use it any time – day and night
  • Lomography is not an interference in your life, but part of it
  • Try the shot from the hip
  • Approach the objects of your Lomographic desire as close as possible
  • Don’t think (William Firebrace)
  • Be fast
  • You don’t have to know beforehand what you captured on film
  • Afterwards either
  • Don’t worry about any rules
Actually, most of these points apply to any candid photography.
You can learn more about lomography here: http://www.lomography.com/ and here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lomography
The image I posted above was done digitally. Most of the work was done in Photoshop CS5 with NIK Color Efex. There is a filter in there called, appropriately, Cross Processing. It allows film to slide and slide to film cross processing effects. In this case, I “processed”  a negative in slide chemicals. I then applied a vignette from within the same Color Efex set of filters.
I can’t see myself applying this to many photos, but you never know what might pop out of the camera that lends itself to this technique. For example, the image above, at least to my mind, is much more interesting than the original (http://robertsjohnj.smugmug.com/Portfolios/Trains-planes-and-automobiles/13531904_jUjb5#1162623525_SVhS7).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s